Welcome!

All the events listed in this calendar are funded in whole or part by New Hampshire Humanities. All are free and open to the public unless otherwise noted. Many of these events are Humanities to Go programs your organization can book, made possible in part by generous support from

 


View a PDF of our MARCH Calendar here.
View a PDF of our APRIL Calendar here.
(To view previous editions of the Calendar, click here.)

Our Humanities to Go Catalog is available online! Click here to view it as a flip book, or click here for PDF.

Tuesday, April 3, 2018

Merrimack Public Library | Merrimack, NH

Northern New England is full of reminders of past lives: stone walls, old foundations, a century-old lilac struggling to survive as the forest reclaims a once-sunny dooryard. What forces shaped settlement, and later abandonment, of these places? Adair Mulligan explores the rich story to be discovered in what remains behind. See how one town has set out to create an inventory of its cellar holes, piecing together the clues in the landscape.

Wednesday, April 4, 2018

Enfield Community Building | Enfield, NH

In 1835, abolitionists opened one of the nation's first integrated schools in Canaan, NH, attracting eager African-American students from as far away as Boston, Providence, and New York City. Outraged community leaders responded by raising a mob that dragged the academy building off its foundation and ran the African-American students out of town. New Hampshire's first experiment in educational equality was brief, but it helped launch the public careers of a trio of extraordinary African-American leaders: Henry Highland Garnet, Alexander Crummell, and Thomas Sipkins Sidney.

Cook Memorial Library | Tamworth, NH

This program opens with the elderly Whitman on the evening of his seventieth birthday. The audience is a visitor in his room as he prepares for his birthday celebration. Whitman begins to reminisce during the telling. He transforms into his young vibrant self and we begin to trace back with him the experiences that led to the creation of Leaves Of Grass, his lifetime work.

Friday, April 6, 2018

Bradford Area Community Center | Bradford, NH

"Your Hit Parade" aired on radio and then on television from 1935 to 1959. It set the standard for American popular music. Calvin Knickerbocker outlines a quarter century of the show's history as a "tastemaker" featuring songs inspired by the Great Depression and on through the advent of rock and roll. He explores the show's relationship with sponsor American Tobacco and Lucky Strike cigarettes and shares stories about the artists the show helped launch and promote, from Frank Sinatra to Elvis. 

Saturday, April 7, 2018

First Congregational Church | Nashua, NH

Quilts tell stories, and quilt history is full of myths and misinformation as well as heart-warming tales of service and tradition. Nearly every world culture that has cold weather uses quilted textiles-quilting is NOT just an American art. Pam Weeks weaves world history, women's history, industrial history and just plain wonderful stories into her presentation. Participants are invited to bring one quilt for identification and/or story sharing.

Sunday, April 8, 2018

Durham Town Hall | Durham, NH

Following World War II, New Hampshire embarked on an extensive program of constructing new highways and improving existing roads to accommodate explosive growth in passenger vehicles and the need for better infrastructure to accommodate commercial traffic. Hundreds of millions in federal, state, and local tax dollars would be expended on this initiative over the second half of the 20th century and road construction would become an enduring part of the state's economy.

Weeks Memorial Library | Lancaster, NH

Quilts tell stories, and quilt history is full of myths and misinformation as well as heart-warming tales of service and tradition. Nearly every world culture that has cold weather uses quilted textiles-quilting is NOT just an American art. Pam Weeks weaves world history, women's history, industrial history and just plain wonderful stories into her presentation. Participants are invited to bring one quilt for identification and/or story sharing.

Jackson Public Library | Jackson, NH

Grace DeRepentigny Metalious believed that in rejecting her own ethnic and religious heritage, she would come closer to inheriting the "American Dream." Her Quebecois ancestry and her formative years in Manchester reveal aspects of the author that the public rarely knew. Robert Perreault focuses on Metalious's most autobiographical and ethnically-oriented but little-known novel, No Adam in Eden.

Monday, April 9, 2018

Lake Sunapee United Methodist Church | Sunapee, NH

Through traditional music Jordan Tirrell-Wysocki relays some of the adventures, misadventures, and emotions experienced by Irish emigrants. The focus is on songs about leaving Ireland, sometimes focusing on the reasons for leaving (a man who is driven from his land by English persecution); sometimes revealing what happened upon arrival (an immigrant drafted into the Union army during the Civil War); and sometimes exploring the universal feeling of homesickness of a stranger in a strange land (a factory worker in London missing his home in County Clare).

Boscawen Municipal/Library Complex | Boscawen, NH

Telling personal and family stories is fun - and much more. Storytelling connects strangers, strengthens links between generations, and gives children the self-knowledge to carry them through hard times. Knowledge of family history has even been linked to better teen behavior and mental health. In this active and interactive program, storyteller Jo Radner shares foolproof ways to mine memories and interview relatives for meaningful stories. Participants practices finding, developing, and telling their own tales.

Proctor Academy Stone Chapel | Andover, NH

Oney Judge Staines, according to the Constitution, was only three-fifths of a person. To her masters, George and Martha Washington, she was merely "the girl." All she wanted was the freedom to control her own actions, but her account of escaping the Executive Mansion in Philadelphia, fleeing north and establishing a life in New Hampshire is not a typical runaway story.

Tuesday, April 10, 2018

Lawrence Barn | Hollis, NH

In this first-person interpretive program, Judith Black introduces American Lucy Stone, the first woman hired by the Massachusetts Anti-Slavery Society as a public speaker and the "Shining Star" of the Abolition and Women's Rights Movements. The presenter dispels well-worn platitudes about the antebellum North by interjecting historic and personal truths about these social reform movements. Her presentation also paints a dynamic and detailed picture of what it takes to change the world you are born into.

North Hampton Public Library | North Hampton, NH

Through traditional music Jordan Tirrell-Wysocki relays some of the adventures, misadventures, and emotions experienced by Irish emigrants. The focus is on songs about leaving Ireland, sometimes focusing on the reasons for leaving (a man who is driven from his land by English persecution); sometimes revealing what happened upon arrival (an immigrant drafted into the Union army during the Civil War); and sometimes exploring the universal feeling of homesickness of a stranger in a strange land (a factory worker in London missing his home in County Clare).

New London Meetinghouse | New London, NH

Fiddle contests evolved from endurance marathons to playing a set number of tunes judged by certain specific criteria.  Whether large or small, fiddle contests tried to show who was the "best," as well as preserve old-time fiddling and raise money for local organizations.  In recent years, the fiddle contest has declined significantly in New England due to cultural changes and financial viability.  The greatest legacies of these contests were recordings made during live competition.

Hampstead Public Library | Hampstead, NH

On a frontier where individualism flourished, New Hampshire's consummate woodsman was just the leader to bring his men back safely from deep in dangerous country, even in stormy, freezing weather. "The famous Major Rogers'" renown was such that he became perhaps the single-best-known American on both sides of the Atlantic. In October 1765, a private audience with young King George III led, eleven months later, to the launching of an expedition to find the long-dreamed-of Northwest passage to the Pacific - forty years before Lewis and Clark.

Elkins Public Library | Canterbury, NH

This program offers a fun and engaging look at the historic and unusual weathervanes found on New Hampshire's churches, town halls, and other public buildings from earliest times down to the present. Highlighted by the visual presentation of a sampling of the vanes found throughout the state, Glenn Knoblock's program will trace the history of weathervanes, their practical use and interesting symbolism, as well as their varied types and methods of manufacture and evolution from practical weather instrument to architectural embellishment.

Wednesday, April 11, 2018

Currier Museum of Art | Manchester, NH

21st U.S. Poet Laureate, Juan Felipe Herrera, will speak at a free public event that includes a poetry reading, performance and conversation followed by a book signing at the Currier Museum of Art in Manchester on Wednesday, April 11. The program celebrates the power of poetry and New Hampshire Humanities’ Connections adult literacy program.

Bedford Public Library | Bedford, NH

Speaking as Betsey Phelps, the mother of a Union soldier from Amherst, New Hampshire who died heroically at the Battle of Gettysburg, Sharon Wood offers an informative and sensitive reflection on that sacrifice from a mother's perspective.  Wood blends the Phelps boy's story with those of other men who left their New Hampshire homes to fight for the Union cause and of the families who supported them on the home front.  

Durham Public Library | Durham, NH

Every town and watershed in New Hampshire has ancient and continuing Native American history. From the recent, late 20th century explosion of local Native population in New Hampshire back to the era of early settlement and the colonial wars, John and Donna Moody explore the history of New Hampshire's Abenaki and Penacook peoples with a focus on your local community.   

Thursday, April 12, 2018

Rye Congregational Church | Rye, NH

One of the Great Bay's most prominent families during the latter part of the 17th century was the Wiggin family. Recently, a team of archaeologists discovered the home of Thomas Wiggin, Jr. Neill DePaoli demonstrates how bay residents on the periphery of Anglo-American settlement were far less isolated and bereft of the comforts of the more "civilized" world than traditionally portrayed.  

Wiggin Memorial Library | Stratham, NH

While servant narratives have been popular for centuries, there seems to be a resurging interest in these stories in recent decades. Many contemporary British and North American writers, filmmakers, and television executives have turned to master/servant relationships as their subject matter. Films like The Remains of the Day and Gosford Park garnered numerous Oscar nominations and substantial box office profits. PBS created such classics as Upstairs, Downstairs and Manor House, as well as the phenomenally successful Downton Abbey!

Kimball Library | Atkinson, NH

In 1837, teenaged Victoria ascended to the British throne, untrained and innocent. Those who would try to usurp her power underestimated this self-willed intelligent young woman whose mettle sustained her through her 63-year reign. Using Queen Victoria's diary and letters, this program reveals the personal details of a powerful yet humane woman, who took seriously her role as monarch in a time of great expansion. She and her husband, Albert, set an example of high moral character and dedication, a novelty in the royal house after generations of scandal.

First Congregational Church | Hampton, NH

Traditional songs, rich in local history and a sense of place, present the latest news from the distant past. They help us to interpret present-day life with an understanding of the working people who built our country. Tavern songs, banjo tunes, 18th century New England hymns, sailor songs, and humorous stories about traditional singers and their songs highlight this informative program by Jeff Warner.

Jaffrey Civic Center | Jaffrey, NH

Northern New England is full of reminders of past lives: stone walls, old foundations, a century-old lilac struggling to survive as the forest reclaims a once-sunny dooryard. What forces shaped settlement, and later abandonment, of these places? Adair Mulligan explores the rich story to be discovered in what remains behind. See how one town has set out to create an inventory of its cellar holes, piecing together the clues in the landscape.

Monday, April 16, 2018

Oyster River High School | Durham, NH

How could a community with good intentions be home to discrimination and racism? How does a state like New Hampshire that is mostly white fit into the national narrative of racial strife, now and in our past? What do we know about race? Through April 2018, residents of Madbury, Lee, and Durham will have the opportunity to investigate race and tolerance in a series of book discussions, lectures, art exhibits, and activities for all ages. The grassroots coalition came together last May as a way to help community members embrace difficult conversations about racism.

Campton Historical Society | Campton, NH

PLEASE NOTE THE DATE CHANGE DUE TO WEATHER FROM MONDAY, APRIL 16 TO APRIL 23.

Tuesday, April 17, 2018

Griffin Free Public Library | Auburn, NH

What family stories do you carry with you? What story do you tell over and over? What landscape do you cherish the most? One of the deepest human instincts is to tell our life stories, to figure out who we are and what it means to be human. This interactive workshop led by Maura MacNeil explores how the landscapes of our lives shape the stories that we tell.

John O'Leary Adult Community Center | Merrimack, NH

This program offers a fun and engaging look at the historic and unusual weathervanes found on New Hampshire's churches, town halls, and other public buildings from earliest times down to the present. Highlighted by the visual presentation of a sampling of the vanes found throughout the state, Glenn Knoblock's program will trace the history of weathervanes, their practical use and interesting symbolism, as well as their varied types and methods of manufacture and evolution from practical weather instrument to architectural embellishment.

Gilman Library | Alton, NH

From its earliest settlements New Hampshire has struggled with issues surrounding the treatment of its poor. The early Northeastern colonies followed the lead of England's 1601 Poor Law, which imposed compulsory taxes for maintenance of the poor but made no distinction between the "vagrant, vicious poor" and the helpless, and honest poor. This confusion persisted for generations and led directly to establishment in most of the state's towns of alms houses and poor farms and, later, county institutions which would collectively come to form a dark chapter in New Hampshire history.

Wednesday, April 18, 2018

George Holmes Bixby Memorial Library | Francestown, NH

Uprooted is a 30-minute documentary based on interviews collected during the Humanities Council's Fences & Neighbors initiative on immigration. It tells the story of five refugees who escaped from war-torn countries to resettle in New Hampshire. The film explores what it means to be a refugee and how it feels to make a new life in a strange place, often without English language skills, family, a job, or community contacts. The film leaves us pondering questions of belonging and citizenship. What does it mean to be an American? Once a refugee, are you destined always to be a refugee?

Conway Public Library | Conway, NH

Over the centuries immigrants from the British Isles have come to the Americas bringing with them their musical styles and tastes as well as their instruments. With the concertina, bodhran, mandolin, octave mandolin, guitar, and banjo, Emery Hutchins and Jim Prendergast sing and play this traditional Celtic music, but they also perform American country music in the way it was conceived in the early twentieth century.

Littleton Public Library | Littleton, NH

On a frontier where individualism flourished, New Hampshire's consummate woodsman was just the leader to bring his men back safely from deep in dangerous country, even in stormy, freezing weather. "The famous Major Rogers" renown was such that he became perhaps the single-best-known American on both sides of the Atlantic. In October 1765, a private audience with young King George III led, eleven months later, to the launching of an expedition to find the long-dreamed-of Northwest passage to the Pacific - forty years before Lewis and Clark.

Shared Ministry Church | Lisbon, NH

Following World War II, New Hampshire embarked on an extensive program of constructing new highways and improving existing roads to accommodate explosive growth in passenger vehicles and the need for better infrastructure to accommodate commercial traffic. Hundreds of millions in federal, state, and local tax dollars would be expended on this initiative over the second half of the 20th century and road construction would become an enduring part of the state's economy.

Wilton Public & Gregg Free Library | Wilton, NH

On August 19, 1997, in little Colebrook, New Hampshire, a 62-year-old carpenter named Carl Drega, a man with long-simmering property rights grievances, murdered state troopers Scott Phillips and Les Lord at a traffic stop in a supermarket parking lot. Then Drega stole Phillips's cruiser and drove downtown to settle some old scores. By the end of the day three more were dead, Drega among them, and four wounded. Occurring on the eve of America's current plague of gun violence, this tragic event made headlines all over the world and shocked New Hampshire out of a previous innocence.

Thursday, April 19, 2018

Whipple Free Library | New Boston, NH

Jose Lezcano presents a multi-media musical program that showcases the guitar in Latin America as an instrument that speaks many languages. Lezcano presents a variety of musical styles: indigenous strummers in ritual festivals from Ecuador, Gaucho music from Argentina, European parlor waltzes from Venezuela, and Afro-Brazilian samba-pagode. He also plays pieces by Villa-Lobos, Brouwer, Lauro, Barrios, Pereira, and examples from his Fulbright-funded research in Ecuador. 

Lawrence Barn | Hollis, NH

The stories we hear from our families tell us who we are and how we should view the world. What tales shaped New England identities in the 17th and 18th centuries? In this performance, storyteller/historian Jo Radner juxtaposes Native American oral traditions and stories told by her own New England ancestors to reveal a complex colonial "middle ground" in which English settlers and Native peoples saw one another as defenders and trespassers, pursuers and refugees, relatives and aliens, kind neighbors and ruthless destroyers.

Friday, April 20, 2018

Community Church of Durham | Durham, NH

Deborah Anne Goss appears as Abby Hutchinson Patton, recalling mid-19th-century U.S. and New Hampshire history and performing rousing anthems, heartfelt ballads, and humorous ditties sung during anti-slavery and early women's rights struggles. In the 1840s and 1850s the Hutchinson Family Singers strongly influenced the opinions of the era with their popular songs promoting healthy living and social justice-most prominently the abolition of slavery. Participants are encouraged to join in the singing on several choruses or read a poem or political diatribe of the time.

Littleton Area Senior Center | Littleton, NH

Singing games, accessible "pocket instruments" like spoons and dancing puppets, tall tales, funny songs, old songs and songs kids teach each other in the playground-all "traditional" in that they have been passed down the generations by word of mouth-will be seen, heard and learned.  We will revisit 1850 or 1910 in a New England town, with families gathered around the kitchen hearth, participating in timeless, hearty entertainment:  a glimpse into how America amused itself before electricity. This program is recommended for adults and children ages 6 and above.

 

Saturday, April 21, 2018

Meredith Public Library | Meredith, NH

Meredith Public Library will host historian and storyteller Jo Radner’s popular day-long Oral History Workshop from 9:00 am until 4:30 pm on April 21. In 2018, the Town of Meredith is commemorating the 250th anniversary of its founding. The library plans to collect oral histories from some of the town’s oldest citizens to record memories of those who participated in the 200th anniversary. These histories will be recorded, transcribed and uploaded to the library’s digital history website to be revealed in the summer of 2018.

Amherst Town Library | Amherst, NH

One hundred years ago, a full generation before Rosie the Riveter, American women rolled up their sleeves and entered war industries where they had never been welcome before. They ran powerful machinery, learned new skills, and faced the sullen hostility of the men in the shops. In this illustrated lecture, historian Carrie Brown reveals their courage and their hard work, asks what impact "the Great War" had on their lives, and explores how these women helped shape the work that their more famous daughters would do in the next World War. THE NELLIE W.

East Grafton Union Church | Grafton, NH

Stories speak to us of community. They hold our history and reflect our identity.  Rebecca Rule has made it her mission over the last 20 years to collect stories of New Hampshire, especially those that reflect what's special about this rocky old place.  She'll tell some of those stories - her favorites are the funny ones - and invite audience members to contribute a few stories of their own. 

Monday, April 23, 2018

Campton Historical Society | Campton, NH

On a frontier where individualism flourished, New Hampshire's consummate woodsman was just the leader to bring his men back safely from deep in dangerous country, even in stormy, freezing weather. "The famous Major Rogers" renown was such that he became perhaps the single-best-known American on both sides of the Atlantic. In October 1765, a private audience with young King George III led, eleven months later, to the launching of an expedition to find the long-dreamed-of Northwest passage to the Pacific - forty years before Lewis and Clark.

Tuesday, April 24, 2018

Gordon Nash Library | New Hampton, NH

Traditional songs, rich in local history and a sense of place, present the latest news from the distant past. They help us to interpret present-day life with an understanding of the working people who built our country. Tavern songs, banjo tunes, 18th century New England hymns, sailor songs, and humorous stories about traditional singers and their songs highlight this informative program by Jeff Warner.

Howe Library | Hanover, NH

Hiphop culture grew out of the South Bronx in the 1970s and 1980s when young people of color combined their genius with available materials to produce the four original elements of hiphop: deejaying, graffiti art, breakdancing, and rapping. Since then, a confluence of young Blacks, American Indians, and Latino/as have used hiphop to reimagine everyday practices, discarded technologies, and public spaces.

Wednesday, April 25, 2018

Newton Town Hall | Newton, NH

Everyone knows that there's "something about lighthouses" that gives them broad appeal, but their vital role in our history and culture is little appreciated. Our early nation was built on maritime economy, and lighthouses were part of the system that made that possible. Due to automation, traditional lighthouse keeping is a way of life that has faded into the past. Jeremy D'Entremont tells the history of New England's historic and picturesque lighthouses primarily focusing on the colorful and dramatic stories of lighthouse keepers and their families.

3rd Congregational Church | Alstead, NH

Covered wooden bridges have been a vital part of the NH transportation network, dating back to the early 1800s. Given NH's myriad streams, brooks, and rivers, it's unsurprising that 400 covered bridges have been documented. Often viewed as quaint relics of a simpler past, they were technological marvels of their day. It may be native ingenuity and NH's woodworking tradition that account for the fact that a number of nationally-noted covered bridge truss designers were NH natives.

Thursday, April 26, 2018

Hooksett Library | Hooksett, NH

Daily life for the Amoskeag Manufacturing Company's textile worker was not easy. Robert Perreault sheds light on how people from a variety of European countries as well as from French Canada made the transition from an agrarian to an industrial society and how that change affected families, cultures, the nature of work, and relationships among workers themselves.

Pierce Manse | Concord, NH

On a frontier where individualism flourished, New Hampshire's consummate woodsman was just the leader to bring his men back safely from deep in dangerous country, even in stormy, freezing weather. "The famous Major Rogers'" renown was such that he became perhaps the single-best-known American on both sides of the Atlantic. In October 1765, a private audience with young King George III led, eleven months later, to the launching of an expedition to find the long-dreamed-of Northwest passage to the Pacific - forty years before Lewis and Clark.

Piermont Old Church Building | Piermont, NH

Following World War II, New Hampshire embarked on an extensive program of constructing new highways and improving existing roads to accommodate explosive growth in passenger vehicles and the need for better infrastructure to accommodate commercial traffic. Hundreds of millions in federal, state, and local tax dollars would be expended on this initiative over the second half of the 20th century and road construction would become an enduring part of the state's economy.

Saturday, April 28, 2018

Bath Public Library | Bath, NH

Musical humorist Charles Ross Taggart grew up in Topsham, Vermont, going on to perform in various lyceum and Chautauqua circuits all across the country for over 40 years starting in 1895.  A fiddler, piano player, comedian, singer, and ventriloquist, he made at least 40 recordings on various labels, as well as appearing in an early talking movie four years before Al Jolson starred in The Jazz Singer. Adam Boyce portrays Mr. Taggart near the end of Taggart's career, c.

Monday, April 30, 2018

Kimball Library | Atkinson, NH

Jose Lezcano presents a multi-media musical program that showcases the guitar in Latin America as an instrument that speaks many languages. Lezcano presents a variety of musical styles: indigenous strummers in ritual festivals from Ecuador, Gaucho music from Argentina, European parlor waltzes from Venezuela, and Afro-Brazilian samba-pagode. He also plays pieces by Villa-Lobos, Brouwer, Lauro, Barrios, Pereira, and examples from his Fulbright-funded research in Ecuador.