When Congress passed the Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security Act (CARES Act), providing $75 million in supplemental funding for cultural institutions affected by the coronavirus, $30 million of that was allocated to state and jurisdictional humanities organizations to support grants to eligible nonprofits for humanities programming and general operating support.

The National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) received $75 Million in supplemental funding to assist cultural institutions and humanists affected by COVID-19 as part of the $2.2 trillion CARES Act economic stabilization plan.

By Lewis Carroll
Read by Neil Gaiman

To our many partners, grantees, supporters, and audience members:  The Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) has been detected in nearly 100 countries around the globe, and several cases have now been confirmed here in New Hampshire.

These programs have been cancelled.

New Hampshire Humanities thanks our many community partners  who enable us to carry out our mission critical programs. In this issue we’d like to spotlight Kirk McNeil, proprietor of Concord’s Area 23 Craft Beer & Ciders and host of several of our Ideas on Tap programs.

Had enough of politics? Think about what you and your community could really use right now. Laughter? Friendship? Perspective? What better time to choose a novel and bring people together through a “community read”? Build in a film, podcast, or speaker, too.

Remembering, reading, listening, and looking are at the heart of several projects supported by New Hampshire Humanities with events this spring. In Dublin, the historical society will hold a facilitated local story collection event to prepare for the town’s centennial.

Students in the Adult Basic Education (ABE) class at Second Start in Concord recently read the book Heart on Fire: Susan B. Anthony Votes for President as part of their ongoing Connections series. They used this book to prepare for their High School Equivalency Test (HiSET) exam.

Dr. Baumgartner is Assistant Professor of American Studies at the University of New Hampshire. She joined our Humanities to Go program last fall to offer a fascinating new presentation, “A Practical Experiment”: School Desegregation on Trial in Antebellum Boston, based on her recent book. We asked Dr.

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