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Living History

Oney Judge Staines, according to the Constitution, was only three-fifths of a person. To her masters, George and Martha Washington, she was merely "the girl." All she wanted was the freedom to control her own actions, but her account of escaping the Executive Mansion in Philadelphia, fleeing north and establishing a life in New Hampshire is not a typical runaway story.

Language and Literature

The recent spate of Sherlock Holmes movies, television shows, and literary adaptations indicate the Great Detective is alive and well in the 21st century. Holmes is the most portrayed literary character of all time, with over 230 film versions alone in several different languages. Over the past century, Sherlockians created societies like the Baker Street Irregulars, wrote articles sussing out the "sources" of Doyle's works, and, most recently, developed an entire online world of Holmesian fan fiction. Sherlock Holmes is now a multi-million dollar industry.

Anthropology and Archaeology, New Hampshire History

The native Abenaki people played a central role in the history of the Monadnock region, defending it against English settlement and forcing the abandonment of Keene and other Monadnock area towns during the French and Indian Wars. Despite this, little is known about the Abenaki, and conventional histories often depict the first Europeans entering an untamed, uninhabited wilderness, rather than the homeland of people who had been there for hundreds of generations.

New Hampshire History

This program presents a brief history of the New Hampshire Presidential Primary, from its origins during the Progressive era of the early twentieth century, through its evolution to the most important step toward being elected President of the United States.  Based around segments from the documentary "The Premier Primary, New Hampshire and Presidential Elections" this program focuses on several memorable moments such as Senator Muskie crying in front of the Union Leader office, and who paid for Ronald Reagan's microphone.  Clips from the documentary are interspersed with discussion and que

Living History

Speaking as Betsey Phelps, the mother of a Union soldier from Amherst, New Hampshire who died heroically at the Battle of Gettysburg, Sharon Wood offers an informative and sensitive reflection on that sacrifice from a mother's perspective. Wood blends the Phelps boy's story with those of other men who left their New Hampshire homes to fight for the Union cause and of the families who supported them on the home front.  PLEASE NOTE: that living history presenters may charge up to $125 extra for their programs.

New Hampshire History

Manchester is one example of the many industrial cities that attracted immigrants from Quebec in numbers large enough to warrant the creation and maintenance of an infrastructure of religious, educational, social, cultural, and commercial institutions that helped preserve this community’s language and traditions. Robert Perreault shares stories about life in one of America’s major Franco-American centers.

Living History

Abraham Lincoln, portrayed by Steve Wood, begins this program by recounting his early life and ends with a reading of the "Gettysburg Address." Along the way he comments on the debates with Stephen Douglas, his run for the presidency, and the Civil War.  PLEASE NOTE: that living history presenters may charge up to $125 extra for their programs. This additional cost is the responsibility of the host organization, not New Hampshire Humanities. Ask the presenter about additional costs for their program at the time of booking. 

Living History

In 1837, teenaged Victoria ascended to the British throne, untrained and innocent. Those who would try to usurp her power underestimated this self-willed intelligent young woman whose mettle sustained her through her 63-year reign. Using Queen Victoria's diary and letters, this program reveals the personal details of a powerful yet humane woman, who took seriously her role as monarch in a time of great expansion. She and her husband, Albert, set an example of high moral character and dedication, a novelty in the royal house after generations of scandal.

American History

Northern New England is full of reminders of past lives: stone walls, old foundations, a century-old lilac struggling to survive as the forest reclaims a once-sunny dooryard. What forces shaped settlement, and later abandonment, of these places? Adair Mulligan explores the rich story to be discovered in what remains behind. See how one town has set out to create an inventory of its cellar holes, piecing together the clues in the landscape.

American History, Living History, Music History and Appreciation, New Hampshire History

Deborah Anne Goss appears as Abby Hutchinson Patton, recalling mid-19th-century U.S. and New Hampshire history and performing rousing anthems, heartfelt ballads, and humorous ditties sung during anti-slavery and early women’s rights struggles. In the 1840s and 1850s the Hutchinson Family Singers strongly influenced the opinions of the era with their popular songs promoting healthy living and social justice—most prominently the abolition of slavery.

Professor Emeritus of History at Plymouth State University, John Allen was awarded the International Skiing History Association’s Lifetime Achievement Award in 2009. He serves as historian for the New England Ski Museum in Franconia, and is the author of several books, including From Skisport to Skiing: One Hundred Years of an American Sport, The Culture and Sport of Skiing from Antiquity to World War II, and A Historical Dictionary of Skiing. Allen has served as a consultant to several ski history documentary films.

Patrick D. Anderson, Gibney Distinguished Professor at Colby-Sawyer College, is a cultural historian who teaches American studies, film, and Native American studies courses. His research on indigenous peoples has taken him to the Pacific Northwest and Alaska, the American Southwest, and Central and South America. Anderson has also written about Hollywood filmmaking and the Academy Awards and hosted a televised film review program, "Reel Talk." He has degrees from the University of Notre Dame and the University of Michigan.

Cristina Ashjian is an art historian and an independent scholar based in Moultonborough, where she is presently the chair of the Moultonborough Heritage Commission. Her current research focuses on late 19th and early 20th century country estates. Ashjian holds an MA in the History of Art from the Courtauld Institute of Art, University of London and a PhD in Modern Art and Architecture from Northwestern University.

photo of Judith Black

Judith Black’s historic tales, commissioned by the US Dept. of the Interior, NPR, Massachusetts Foundation for the Humanities, the USS Constitution Museum and many others, have received standing ovations at the Smithsonian Institution and Storytelling Festivals worldwide. She has keynoted the National Interpreters Conference: a standing ovation met her address on discerning truths from exploring multiple vantage points on our national history.

Dr. Kiki Berk is an Associate Professor of Philosophy at Southern New Hampshire University and currently holds the Papoutsy Chair in Ethics and Social Responsibility. She received her Ph.D. in Philosophy from the VU University Amsterdam in 2010. Her current research interests include value theory (especially happiness), analytic existentialism (especially the meaning of life), and the philosophy of death. 

Dr. Berk is a presenter in our "Open Questions" Humanities to Go programs. For more information, click HERE

comic of Marek Bennett

Marek Bennett teaches music and comics in New England and the world beyond. He holds an M.Ed in Curriculum and Instruction from Keene State College, and is a rostered teaching artist with the New Hampshire State Council on the Arts. His work includes the graphic novel The Civil War Diary of Freeman Colby and the NH history webcomic Live Free and Draw. His historical band The Hardtacks received a 2016 "Best of NH" award from NH Magazine. 

Chris Benedetto has taught history courses at Granite State College since 2009. He has published numerous articles on New Hampshire history and co-authored the book Union Soldier of the American Civil War: A Visual Reference. In 2013, Chris was presented with a "Good Steward" Award from the Campus Compact for New Hampshire for his continuing contributions to community education and historical preservation. He has also been a member of various American Revolution and Civil War re-enactment organizations for over twenty years.

Raised in the Lakes Region, Dan Billin earned a BA in Communications from Brigham Young University. He worked as a newspaper reporter for the Valley News in Lebanon, New Hampshire for seventeen years. Billin's passion for history and nose for a story led him to uncover a wealth of detail about the shocking and largely forgotten tale of the birth and death of Noyes Academy.

Kabria Baumgartner is an assistant professor of American studies at the University of New Hampshire at Durham where she teaches nineteenth century African American culture, history, and literature. Her book, In Pursuit of Knowledge: Black Women and Educational Activism in Antebellum America (New York University Press, 2019), explores the history of school desegregation in the nineteenth century Northeast by focusing on the educational experiences of African American girls and women. Her next book uncovers the lives of indentured African American girls in the antebellum Northeast. 

Adam Boyce, a 10th-generation Vermonter and lifelong student of history, has been a popular Humanities to Go presenter since 2005. Beginning in 1991, when Boyce started dancing, fiddling, calling and playing the piano, he has made a study of nearly every aspect of traditional New England dancing and music history. Boyce has also been a regular on fiddle contest circuits as a judge, piano accompanist, and as a competitor.